KIDS A SAFE PLACE TO LIVE. BUT WE BEGIN. WITH A LOCAL DOG BECOMING THE FACE OF A LOCAL EMERGENCY. GOOD EVENING, EVERYBODY. I’M KRIS KETZ AND I’M LARA MORITZ. AND THIS. IS SCOOBY. HE HAS SPENT NEARLY A YEAR AT GREAT PLAINS SPCA AND HIS TIME IS RUNNING OUT. AND TONIGHT, KMBC NINE’S REBECCA GANNON REPORTS HIS STORY IS ONE OF THOUSANDS WHO NEED YOUR HELP RIGHT NOW. FOR THE LAST SEVERAL MONTHS, EVEN THE LAST SEVERAL YEARS, WE’VE BEEN TELLING YOU HOW FULL OUR ANIMAL SHELTERS ARE. SO TODAY WE WENT TO THE THREE LARGEST IN THE METRO AREA, KC PET PROJECT SHELTER IS ON TRACK TO TAKE IN 16,000 ANIMALS THIS YEAR. BUT IT WAS BUILT TO HOLD 10,000. SO IT’S JUST BEEN CONSTANT FOR THE PAST TWO YEARS OF SEEING THIS DRASTIC INCREASE. WE HAD 107 ANIMALS COME IN YESTERDAY. JUST YESTERDAY. THAT’S A LOT OF EXTRA DOGS AND A LOT OF EXTRA BARKING. AND ALL THAT CAN STRESS A DOG OUT LIKE SCOOBY, WHO IS SO STRESSED. HE’S ON XANAX. HE’S BEEN AT THE GREAT PLAINS SPCA SHELTER FOR MORE THAN 300 DAYS. AND THE NO-KILL SHELTER SAYS IT MAY HAVE TO EUTHANIZE HIM WITH SCOOBY. IT IS DEFINITELY IT’S NOT A SPACE ISSUE. IT’S A QUALITY OF LIFE ISSUE. THE PROBLEM THAT’S HAPPENING, THOUGH, IS THE SHELTERS ARE ALL FILLING UP, SO MORE AND MORE PETS ARE GETTING STRESSED OUT. AND NOW YOU’VE GOT SHELTERS WITH STRESS, PETS HERE AND ACROSS THE COUNTRY. AND THAT’S THE COMMUNITY PROBLEM THAT WE’RE FACING. IT’S REALLY A LOT OF COMBINING FACTORS. SO WHAT WE’RE SEEING IN KANSAS CITY, IT’S AN ECONOMIC REASON BETWEEN THE COST OF VETERINARY CARE AND THE COST OF HOUSING AND INFLATION. WE SEE SO MANY PEOPLE COMING IN EVERY DAY THAT DON’T WANT TO DO THIS. THEY DON’T WANT TO GIVE THEIR PETS UP TO THE SHELTER, BUT THEY ARE OUT OF OPTIONS. SO LET’S SAY THAT YOU CAN’T ADOPT RON STOPPABLE HERE AND YOU HAVE NO INTENTIONS TO ADOPT. THAT’S OKAY. THERE ARE OTHER WAYS YOU CAN HELP, AND WE HAVE THAT ON OUR WEBSITE RIGHT NOW. JUST GO TO CNBC.COM, REBECCA GANNON, AND THIS ISN’T A PROBLEM LIMITED TO KANSAS CITY SHELTERS ACROSS THE COUNTRY. ALL THE SHELTERS ARE FULL, BUT SHELTE

Scooby, the face of thousands of shelter animals in Kansas City, may be euthanized next week

For months now, years even, we’ve been telling you how full our animal shelters are. Today, they are at capacity – again.”Over the last two years, it’s been a constant of seeing this drastic increase,” explained Tori Fugate of Kansas City Pet Project. “We had 107 animals come in yesterday.”The KC Pet Project shelter near Swope Park was built to hold 10,000 animals a year. This year, it’s on track to surpass 16,000. Its kennels, designed with a dividing door to give the dogs space to run and stretch their legs and an area to sleep in, are now half their recommended size. The dividing door is down to accommodate the influx of dogs to the shelter.The dogs show their stress by jumping, licking, scratching, and barking. Some dogs don’t do well in that environment.Scooby at Great Plains SPCA is an excellent example of that. “He was even featured in Newsweek – a global online magazine, ” said Great Plains SPCA CEO Tam Singer, “and it resulted in zero interest. Not one person.”Scooby’s been at the shelter for 300 days and is so stressed he’s on Xanex – the second time in six years the shelter has provided a dog with that kind of medication. In his nearly year at the shelter, only one person has even looked at him. The no-kill shelter says it may have to euthanize him.”With Scooby, it’s not a space issue, it’s a quality of life issue,” explained Singer. “The problem is that all the shelters are filling up. So more and more pets are getting stressed. And now you’ve got shelters with stressed pets here and across the country. And that’s the community problem that we’re facing.””It’s really a lot of combining factors,” explained KC Pet Project’s Fugate. “So what we’re seeing in KC, it’s economic reasons.””The number one reason pets are coming into the shelter right now – lack of affordable veterinary care,” she continued. “Housing is another big reason that pets are coming in. People cannot find a place to live that will allow their pets, especially large breed dogs. Those animals are suffering as a result.””We are just seeing that people just don’t have options,” Fugate emphasized. “They don’t have resources; they don’t have the funding to be able to provide the care. And so we as a city need to be able to look into the future and figure out how we will be able to combat and address some of these systemic issues that we’re seeing.”At Great Plains SPCA with Scooby, Singer also noted how many people adopted puppies – only to return them days later, for acting like puppies. This week, someone surrendered a mini Australian Shepard. “You would get these dogs occasionally – now they are the norm,” said Singer. “Three different golden doodles in three months. King Charles Spaniels surrendered to shelters. It’s just a different game this year.”All shelters – Wayside Waifs, Great Plains, and KC Pet Project – say they desperately need foster families to keep these animals out of the shelter, but available for adoption. In lieu of that, they ask everyone to spay or neuter their pets and make sure they’re microchipped – and the information is up to date. As always, the organizations welcome donations for food and veterinary care.Click here to donate to KC Pet Project, and click here if you’re interested in fostering for the organization.Click here for donation information for Great Plains SPCA, and here to apply for the foster program, and here to learn more about Scooby, who must be the only animal in the house.The Wayside Waifs website has wish lists, a donation section, and information on its foster program.

For months now, years even, we’ve been telling you how full our animal shelters are. Today, they are at capacity – again.

“Over the last two years, it’s been a constant of seeing this drastic increase,” explained Tori Fugate of Kansas City Pet Project. “We had 107 animals come in yesterday.”

The KC Pet Project shelter near Swope Park was built to hold 10,000 animals a year.

This year, it’s on track to surpass 16,000. Its kennels, designed with a dividing door to give the dogs space to run and stretch their legs and an area to sleep in, are now half their recommended size. The dividing door is down to accommodate the influx of dogs to the shelter.

The dogs show their stress by jumping, licking, scratching, and barking. Some dogs don’t do well in that environment.

Scooby at Great Plains SPCA is an excellent example of that. “He was even featured in Newsweek – a global online magazine, ” said Great Plains SPCA CEO Tam Singer, “and it resulted in zero interest. Not one person.”

Scooby’s been at the shelter for 300 days and is so stressed he’s on Xanex – the second time in six years the shelter has provided a dog with that kind of medication. In his nearly year at the shelter, only one person has even looked at him. The no-kill shelter says it may have to euthanize him.
“With Scooby, it’s not a space issue, it’s a quality of life issue,” explained Singer. “The problem is that all the shelters are filling up. So more and more pets are getting stressed. And now you’ve got shelters with stressed pets here and across the country. And that’s the community problem that we’re facing.”

“It’s really a lot of combining factors,” explained KC Pet Project’s Fugate. “So what we’re seeing in KC, it’s economic reasons.”

“The number one reason pets are coming into the shelter right now – lack of affordable veterinary care,” she continued. “Housing is another big reason that pets are coming in. People cannot find a place to live that will allow their pets, especially large breed dogs. Those animals are suffering as a result.”

“We are just seeing that people just don’t have options,” Fugate emphasized. “They don’t have resources; they don’t have the funding to be able to provide the care. And so we as a city need to be able to look into the future and figure out how we will be able to combat and address some of these systemic issues that we’re seeing.”

At Great Plains SPCA with Scooby, Singer also noted how many people adopted puppies – only to return them days later, for acting like puppies.

This week, someone surrendered a mini Australian Shepard. “You would get these dogs occasionally – now they are the norm,” said Singer. “Three different golden doodles in three months. King Charles Spaniels surrendered to shelters. It’s just a different game this year.”

All shelters – Wayside Waifs, Great Plains, and KC Pet Project – say they desperately need foster families to keep these animals out of the shelter, but available for adoption.

In lieu of that, they ask everyone to spay or neuter their pets and make sure they’re microchipped – and the information is up to date. As always, the organizations welcome donations for food and veterinary care.

Click here to donate to KC Pet Project, and click here if you’re interested in fostering for the organization.

Click here for donation information for Great Plains SPCA, and here to apply for the foster program, and here to learn more about Scooby, who must be the only animal in the house.
The Wayside Waifs website has wish lists, a donation section, and information on its foster program.

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