Grim warning for pet owners to watch out for tiny coin-sized jellyfish after vet treated six dogs in a single day for horror symptoms including ‘violent vomiting’

  • An alarming amount of dogs are swallowing this poisonous  sea creature
  • Symptoms include lip-licking, fever, vomiting, and dark mucus
  • Vets warn they’re hard to spot at only 2.5cm in diameter 

A vet has issued an urgent warning to pet owners after treating a spate of dogs that had eaten a coin-sized jellyfish, leaving them ‘profusely’ vomiting and shaking. 

In what is becoming an annual plague, dozens of blue button stingers have washed up across Sunshine Coast beaches in the past week and been eaten by unsuspecting canines.

Noosa vet Divya Nemani told the ABC she had treated six dogs in just one day last Wednesday – the most she has ever seen in a single day. 

‘All of them came in with very, very similar clinical signs,’ she told the broadcaster. 

‘They’d been at the beach and then 15 minutes after being at the beach, they started vomiting and then profusely vomiting.

Hundreds of blue buttons (pictured) can wash up at a single beach at a time

Around the size of a 10 cent coin, it's easy to miss blue buttons (pictured)

Dogs have a tendency to interact with any strange objects they come across, which makes blue buttons (pictured) so dangerous during walks 

Jan Bolton, a Peregian Beach resident, was one of those who was forced to rush her furry friend into the clinic after she saw her Spoodle, Lily, swallow the coin-sized creature during a walk.

‘Lily was making this horrific howling, screaming noise when she was trying to retch,’ Ms Bolton told the network. 

‘The vet [who] ended up giving her an antihistamine as well because she thought she might have been having an allergic reaction to it.’

Typical symptoms for a dog who’s eaten a blue button include lip-licking, lethargy, excessive drooling and a fever, with some dogs developing dark mucous.

The vast number of sick dogs Dr Nemani saw last week led her to advise owners to wipe their dog’s mouth with a cloth should they interact with a blue button. 

If symptoms develop, Dr Nemani told owners to take their pets straight to the vet for treatment. 

Local vet Divya Nemani (pictured) said her team had never treated so many blue button poisonings in a single day

Local vet Divya Nemani (pictured) said her team had never treated so many blue button poisonings in a single day

An emergency animal clinic in Noosa, Queensland (pictured) has told dog owners to watch out after an extraordinary workday when six dogs were rushed in last Wednesday.

An emergency animal clinic in Noosa, Queensland (pictured) has told dog owners to watch out after an extraordinary workday when six dogs were rushed in last Wednesday.

These latest cases follow a trend of dogs eating blue buttons as tropical climates, heavy tides and strong coastal winds wash countless amounts of them onto beaches each summer.

Speaking to ABC over a year ago, a nurse in Paradise Point, warned owners not to walk their dogs on beaches where they can see the jellyfish-like creatures have washed up.

‘We go through seasons when there are so many down on the beaches [and] we just try and make sure that people are avoiding them, because dogs are notorious for eating anything that they can find,’ Ms Nolan said at the time.

‘The key is to take the dog to the vet within the first hour of them eating anything and just kind of getting on top of it as soon as possible.’

Symptoms to watch out for if your dog eats a blue button stinger 

Canines which accidentally swallow tiny blue buttons can be identified by keeping an eye out for symptoms including constant lip-licking, drowsiness, lethargy and excessive drooling.

More severe reactions to the sting can include developing a fever, incessant itching, nausea or vomiting, and dark mucous can sometimes ooze from their mouth and nose.

link

By admin